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  • chrismolla 4:44 am on February 11, 2010 Permalink | Reply
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    Unexpected results of some music research 

    While working on the arrangement of GBBT, I wanted to look at some examples of uses of brass instruments to get that Boston Pops/Hollywood/Disneyschmaltz/over-the-top marchy style sound. In the course of this search I turned to an iconic American master, John Phillip Sousa. Not only was the search edifying, but I learned that one of his very very very famous marches is titled…(drum roll)… The Washington Post March. Naturally, it became imperative that the composition be quoted in the show somehow.

    You’ve heard this many times in many contexts. Like the dreaded Sherman brothers, JPS was one of the foremost earworm composers of his day. His stuff is still popular (there seems to be some kind of law requiring orchestras to play The Stars and Stripes Forever at the requisite 4th of July concert as the fireworks go off). One other funny thing I realized about this piece, however, is that I had only ever heard excerpts from it. I instantly recognized every tune in each section, but didn’t realize they were all part of the same piece until I looked at the whole thing.

    There is a great recording of The Washington Post March on You Tube of all places. When I really listened, I heard a lot of cool stuff going on in it.

    CM says check it out.

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    • kimberlymj 6:20 pm on February 11, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      yes, this has to go in somewhere! if not right at the N.D.S., then in the beginning. great find.

      • chrismolla 10:44 pm on February 11, 2010 Permalink | Reply

        It’s already in there. The up-tempo funeral recessional is based on the tune in the second half. Maybe someone will get the joke.

  • chrismolla 3:07 am on January 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply
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    Ye Olde Sentinel Building 

    These are some photos I took of the old Santa Cruz Sentinel building way back in September of 08. At the time we were drooling over the weird, cavernous room – it’s where the printer used to be – and thought about what an awesome place it would be to stage a performance or do an installation. It eventually became one of the big inspirations for the show.

     
  • chrismolla 5:31 am on January 14, 2010 Permalink | Reply
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    Another Version of “Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow” 

    The whole presentation is astounding…and edifying.

     
    • kimberlymj 9:31 am on January 14, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      They sing about as beautifully as we do.

    • Jessica Faith 11:19 pm on January 14, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      Disney’s presentation about the Pavilion (after the song) is pretty amazing…

    • chrismolla 3:43 am on January 16, 2010 Permalink | Reply

      It’s pretty clear that the presentation is intended not for the public, but for GE executives. That thought certainly changes the tenor of Disney’s remark about the song being “written especially for you,”. Watching this, gives me an icky kind of feeling that I get when I hear super-capitalist business people talk about ideas, or discuss their ventures in terms of the public good. I can’t shake the sense that the ideas themselves don’t actually matter, except in relation to their potential for profit. That’s when I get the creeps.

      My editorial twopence.

  • chrismolla 5:08 am on January 14, 2010 Permalink | Reply  

    Reblog 

    This is a reiteration of an older post, but I loved this article in Utne Reader. I think it’s a very cogent perspective on our  peculiar historical moment with respect to information, news, literacy, etc.

     
  • chrismolla 5:02 am on January 14, 2010 Permalink | Reply  

    Re: the Bill Joy Video Below 

    Just a couple of remarks about the very interesting Bill Joy TED talk. I just wanted to note that it’s clear from this talk that Joy is certainly not in any way anti-technology, or arguing from a Luddist perspective. He’s clearly believes in the power of technology – and capital. What he does say essentially, and this is the part that capital abhors, is that there are important dimensions of life and of civilization lying outside the spheres of capitalism and technology that must be brought to bear on the dilemmas created by them. Moral imagination is required: old-fashioned thinking – no computers necessary, in fact, technology can get in the way here.

    For the hard-core Luddite perspective, the Wikipedia article is a good start. Then You might check out Kirkpatrick Sale’s book Rebels Against the Future. The history is fascinating  – and more complex that most people who throw the word “luddite” around probably know.

     
  • chrismolla 9:36 pm on November 5, 2009 Permalink | Reply
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    Everybody’s Stuff 

    The following five posts will contain each group member’ list of responsibilities, as transcribed off the chalkboard from Monday, 11/02.

     
  • chrismolla 7:44 pm on October 26, 2009 Permalink | Reply
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    Annotated Event List 

    Jess is also making a spreadsheet version of these ideas.

    STOP THE PRESS – EVENT LIST

    1. 1. Audience enters through hallway. Alex’s “2014” video bit.
      1. Area: “Hallway”
      2. One projector, a large screen at the end of the hallway. Three monitors on the inside wall, lights from the ceiling. Six small speakers, one large speaker at the end of the hall.
    2. 2. Opening music (Foreign Correspondents’ Rag). Newspaper delivery (newspaper is the program).
      1. As people enter, we’re counting on them to distribute themselves evenly in the seats on either side of the “tennis court” seating.
      2. Area: “Floor”
      3. Two deliverers on foot, two on bicycles (live actors).
      4. Sound: Live band (on mezzanine, Foreign Correspondents Rag (Chris).
        1. One violin, viola, contrabass, keyboard, percussionist.
        2. Four microphones, direct input from keys to soundboard. Headphone monitors as necessary.
      5. Video projection on the Press (on floor, Kathleen, Topher)
      6. The Program
        1. Cast list
        2. Acknowledgements
        3. Event list
        4. Any instructions the audience may need to experience the show.
        5. Student to write it.
    3. Printer’s expository monologue with printer’s reactions (sounds, belching steam, lights).
      1. Jim may want to write it.
      2. On the Press, video projections (Kathleen, Topher), sounds (Chris. Recorded coming from the Press) Press needs one internal light and speaker, follow spot on speaker. Student techs make light cues.
      3. Text and/or images. projected on large screens (A and C, All contribute)
      4. Monologue could be delivered from the Press platform as it rotates.
    4. 4. Ray Kurzwiel as talking head pontificates.
      1. a. Projected on balloon (Topher)
      2. b. Above B
    5. 5. Newspaper funeral. Newspapers’ complaints.
      1. a. Live actors
      2. b. Writing (Jess)
      3. c. Projections on A and C, video montage (Alex, Kathleen, Chris)
        1. 1. Possible spinning papers
      4. d. Music – Funeral March, band
    6. 6. Alex’s talking-head commentary/faux interviews projections.
      1. a. Video of actors, projected on A and C (Alex)
      2. b. Commentary reenactment  with Cartoon speech bubbles projected on the press (B)
      3. c. Lighting cues to direct the audience
      4. d. Chorus actors
    7. 7. Ray K. speaks again.
      1. a. Projected on balloon (Topher)
      2. b. Above B
    8. 8. Dowd vs. Schmidt
      1. a. Video projection: scorecards on A and C (Student with Kathleen’s supervision). Lights on B-platform.
      2. b. Two armchairs
      3. c. Platform rotates (Chorus members).
    9. 9. Animation Dance, Text Dance.
      1. a. Text Dance
        1. 1. Two computers
        2. 2. 4 RFID readers
        3. 3. video camera
        4. 4. text projection on dancer (text Chris, Jess)
        5. 5. projection on screen C
        6. 6. Music (Chris)
        7. 7. Dancer (
      2. b. Animation Dance            (MoCap dance to be determined Monday, 10/26!)
        1. 1. Stage A projection
        2. 2. Dancer (Student choreographer)
        3. 3. Music live and computer (Chris)
        4. 4. Animation (Kathleen)
        5. 5. Dialogue (Kathleen)
    10. Ray K. appears once more as projection. Rosie enters. Each delivers their speech, competing for audiences attention. Printer responds with noises and lights. Text comments and quotes taken from blogs, articles, (also written or reworked by us) etc., are projected. Alex’s talking heads and newspaper video collages projected. Music recapping themes from dances and “Foreign Correspondents’ Rag”. Computer music, mechanical (typewriter etc.) music. Newspapers fall from above and are scattered across the stage. Scene becomes chaotic. Action ends suddenly. Lights out.
      1. Reprise of tech used previously.
        1. Projections on large screens A and C
        2. Ray K. projection on balloon
        3. Music live and computer
        4. Light, projections sound and smoke from Press
        5. Actors center
    1. In addition, there will be newspaper pages falling from the ceiling and blowing across the stage.
      1. Newspapers
      2. Fans to move papers across stage
      3. Crew dumping papers from above.
    2. Ray K. appears alone onstage, sitting on a toilet reading the news on an electronic reader. Announces the end of the show. (I think there needs to be some kind of epilogue-type thing here, in which the audience is addressed directly, in the manner of a Shakespeare comedy, etc.).

    “CURTAIN”

     

     

     

    Throughout the piece, the Printer makes noises and displays lights and projections, belches steam, etc. by way of comment on action and speeches. Projected text can also provide commentary on action. There should be a multiplicity of voices throughout, to reflect the complexity of the issue.

     
  • chrismolla 4:41 am on October 20, 2009 Permalink | Reply
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    “Newspapers Save Society” 

    An article in UTNE Reader.

     
  • chrismolla 1:25 am on October 20, 2009 Permalink | Reply
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    Event List 

    Here’s the event list I presented earlier today. I’ll post an annotated version when I go through all the notes from class today.

    STOP THE PRESS – EVENT LIST

    1. Audience enters through hallway. Alex’s “1984” video bit.
    2. Opening music (Foreign Correspondents’ Rag). Newspaper delivery (newspaper is the program).
    3. Rosie the Printer monologue with printer’s response (sounds, belching steam, lights).
    4. Ray Kurzwiel as talking head pontificates.
    5. Newspaper funeral. Newspapers’ complaints.
    6. Alex’s talking-head commentary/faux interviews projections.
    7. Ray K. speaks again.
    8. Dowd vs. Schmidt (Vin Scully simlecast!).
    9. Audience is directed to side rooms. MoCap Dance, Text Dance.
    10. Audience groups switch places (Text Dance, MoCap Dance).
    11. Audience directed to take seats.
    12. Ray K. appears once more as projection. Rosie enters. Each delivers their speech, competing for audiences attention. Printer responds with noises and lights. Text comments and quotes taken from blogs, articles, (also written or reworked by us) etc., are projected. Alex’s talking heads and newspaper video collages projected. Music recapping themes from dances and “Foreign Correspondents’ Rag”. Computer music, mechanical (typewriter etc.) music. Newspapers fall from above and are scattered across the stage. Scene becomes chaotic. Action ends suddenly. Lights out.
    13. (I can’t help it. I have to throw this in!) Ray K. appears alone onstage, sitting on a toilet reading the news on an electronic reader. Announces the end of the show. (I think there needs to be some kind of epilogue-type thing here, in which the audience is addressed directly, in the manner of a Shakespeare comedy, etc.).

    “CURTAIN”

    Throughout the piece, the Printer makes noises and displays lights and projections, belches steam, etc. by way of comment on action and speeches. Projected text can also provide commentary on action. There should be a multiplicity of voices throughout, to reflect the complexity of the issue.

     
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